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Wednesday, May 24, 2006

Welcome To London

Disclaimer: some of the pictures are dark and unclear its NOT because of the camara its the weather of London Cloudy and Rainy it Britain its called "The British Summer"
England
English Flag English Coat of Arms
(Flag) (Coat of Arms)
Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit
(Translated: "God and my right")

Thursday:
Just when I thought it would be quiet for a bit I decided its time that i go to London for a couple of days so that's what i did. Thursday Morning May 18Th i had a 6:30 flight from Warsaw, Poland to Luton, England. I landed at 8:15 till i cleared customs and got my luggage it was 8:45. I needed to get some Pounds (£) so i went to the Exchange Center TravelEX and they wanted 2.5% plus £5 Pounds so i went to a ATM instead. i took out £40 pounds the Bank charged that as $80.00. i then went to make a quick call to a local cell phone and billed it to a CC and they charged $8.00 for 3 minutes. I then caught a EasyBus from Luton Airport to Baker Street which cost £8 pounds, and takes about one hour. From there i transferred to the Underground-Tube- Baker Street Station. and took the Metropolitan line (PURPLE LINE) for 3 Stops untill Kings Cross which there I transferred to the Northern Line (BLACK LINE) and took it till East Finchley where there I transferred to Bus 102 and took it untill the yeshiva which is located on 3-5 Kingsley Way in Hampstead Gardens Suburb.
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EasyBus
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What is Oyster?
Oyster is London’s travel smartcard. You can put your Travelcard or Bus Pass season ticket on it, add travel value (cash) to pay as you go or have a combination of both.Oyster cards are also reusable. This means that when your ticket expires you can buy another on the same Oyster card, and when your travel value (cash) runs out, you can just top it up.

Lowest fare promise

During any 24-hour period from 0430 to 0430 the following day, you will never pay more than 50p less than the equivalent Day Travelcard price for all your Oyster single journeys in Zones 1-6 or we will refund the difference. Alternatively, if you are using only the bus or tram, you’ll pay no more than £3, 50p less than the price of a One Day Bus Pass.

For this promise to apply on Tube, DLR and participating National Rail services, you must touch in and touch out at the beginning and end of any journey you make. On buses and trams, you must touch in at the start of each journey.


Oyster in Use
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During the day i basically hung around the yeshiva talking to a couple o bochurim and learning with a few guys. at 7:00 P.M.
I went to Golders Green-Golders Green Road To Milk and Honey For Supper.
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Me & Moshe Minskey
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Yanekl Raskin i slept in his room.
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There was a Farby for Thursday night and i ended up on going to sleep very late Thursday night and i thought i would sleep till like 10 in the morning as i had not slept the night before at all since i had to catch the flight.
Friday:
Well at 7:30 Rabbi Gordon walked into my room and told me "Zarchi The Lubavitcher Rebbe Is Waiting" so there my sleep went and i had to get out of bed. we daven Shacris and then made a couple of phone calls and then went downtown.
On the way to Easy Fichley for Mivtozhoyim
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Me and Yossi Gross
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Sherlock Holmes is a fictional detective of the late 19th and early 20th centuries who made his first published appearance in 1887. He was devised by Scottish author and physician Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Holmes is famous for his prowess at using logic and astute observation to solve cases. He is perhaps the most famous fictional detective, and indeed one of the best known and universally recognizable literary characters.

Conan Doyle wrote four novels and fifty-six short stories featuring his creation. Almost all were narrated by Holmes' friend and biographer, Dr. John H. Watson, with the exception of two narrated by Holmes himself and two more written in the third person. The stories first appeared in magazine serialization, notably in The Strand, over a period of forty years. This was a common form of publication at the time: Charles Dickens' works were issued in a similar fashion. The stories cover a period from around 1878 up to 1903, with a final case in 1914.

It is worth noting that more actors have played the role of Sherlock Holmes than any other character, and by 1964, according to a report in the Times, the world-wide sales of the Sherlock Holmes stories was running second only to The Bible, which remains by far the bestselling book of all time.

Sherlock Holmes Statue
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Madame Tussaud’s is one of the top 5 UK attractions in London receiving more over 2.7 million visitors per year. Madame Tussaud’s herself started the exhibition over 200 years ago and it now has wax models of dozens of famous celebrities from all over the world. Located on Marylebone Road NW1 Madame Tussaud’s is a minute walk away from Baker Street tube Station and right next door to the London Planetarium.
Madame Tussauds
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Oxford Street is the world's most famous street for shopping.

AND MOST EXPENSIVE!!!!!!!!!!!!

Oxford Street is a major London, England, shopping street in the City of Westminster. Oxford Street is the world's busiest and most famous shopping street running for three miles and all worldwide shops are represented here. It is comparable to Fifth Avenue in New York, many people regard these two streets the best shopping streets in the world. It runs from Marble Arch at the north east corner of Hyde Park, through Oxford Circus to its termination at St Giles' Circus, at the intersection with Charing Cross Road and Tottenham Court Road. The road then becomes New Oxford Street until it runs into High Holborn. To the west, Oxford Street becomes Bayswater Road (at Marble Arch). Oxford Street intersects with other famous London roads including Park Lane, New Bond Street and Regent Street.

Oxford Street
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Look right
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Piccadilly Circus :
is a famous traffic intersection and public space of London's West End in the City of Westminster. Built in 1819 to connect Regent Street with the major shopping street of Piccadilly (the "circus" refers to "circular open space at a street junction"), it now links directly to the theatres on Shaftesbury Avenue as well as the Haymarket, Coventry Street (onwards to Leicester Square) and Glasshouse Street. Its proximity to major shopping and entertainment areas, its central location at the heart of the West End, and its status as a major traffic intersection have made Piccadilly Circus a busy meeting point and a tourist attraction in its own right.
It is renowned for its video display and neon signs mounted on the corner building on the northern side, as well as the Shaftesbury memorial fountain and statue known as 'Eros' (sometimes called 'The Angel of Christian Charity', which would be better translated as 'Agape', but formally 'Anteros' - see below). It is surrounded by several noted buildings, including the London Pavilion and Criterion Theatre. Directly underneath the plaza is the London Underground station Piccadilly Circus.
They say you can't stand here 37 minutes without meeting someone you know.
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Piccadilly Circus memorial fountain
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Buckingham Palace:
is the official London residence of the British monarch. The Palace is a setting for state occasions and royal entertaining, a base for all officially visiting Heads of State, and a major tourist attraction. It has been a rallying point for British people at times of national rejoicing, national crisis and national grief. "Buckingham Palace" or simply "The Palace" is also a common way of referring to the source of press statements coming from the British Royal Family (see metonymy).
The palace, originally known as Buckingham House (and still nicknamed "Buck House" by the royal family), was a large townhouse built for the Duke of Buckingham in 1703 and acquired by King George III in 1762 as a private residence. It was enlarged over the next 75 years, principally by architects John Nash and Edward Blore, forming three wings around a central courtyard. Buckingham Palace finally became the official royal palace of the British monarch on the accession of Queen Victoria in 1837. The last major structural additions were made in the late 19th and early 20th Century, with the addition of the large wing facing east towards The Mall, and the removal of the former state entrance, Marble Arch, to its present position near Speakers' Corner in Hyde Park. The east front was refaced in Portland stone in 1913 as a backdrop to the Victoria Memorial, creating the present-day 'public face' of Buckingham Palace, including the famous balcony.
The original Georgian interior designs included widespread use of brightly coloured scagliola and blue and pink lapis, on the advice of Sir Charles Long. King Edward VII oversaw a heavy redecoration in a Belle epoque cream and gold colour scheme. Many smaller reception rooms are furnished in the Chinese regency style with furniture and fittings brought from the Royal Pavilion at Brighton and from Carlton House following the death of King George IV. The Buckingham Palace Gardens are the largest private gardens in London, originally landscaped by Capability Brown, but redesigned by William Townsend Ailton of Kew Gardens and John Nash. The man-made lake was completed in 1828 and is supplied with water from the Serpentine, a lake in Hyde Park.

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I Found this picture but it looks a bit fake no clouds quite impossible.
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Buckingham Palace and the Victoria Memorial. This principal façade of 1850 by Edward Blore was redesigned in 1913 by Sir Aston Webb.
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Buckingham Palace and the Victoria Memorial. This principal façade of 1850 by Edward Blore was redesigned in 1913 by Sir Aston Webb.
Buckingham Palace in 2005
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Buckingham Palace in 2005

The Victoria Memorial


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Horse Guards Parade.
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Memorial to the women who served in World War II

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Look Left
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County Hall
County Hall on the South side of the River Thames by Westminster Bridge.
Once the home of London Government and now home to the London Aquarium,
Marriott Hotel and Saatchi Gallery.

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House of Parliment House of Parliment is located in the heart of London, Westminster. The House of Parliament is the seat of the Government of the United Kingdom. The Palace of Westminster consists of the House of Commons and the House of Lords. A gentle walk from Westminster Tube Station just near the River Thames, the amazing scenery is breathtaking. Right next to the Houses of Parliament you will also find Big Ben which is also located on Parliament Square, London SW1.
Big Ben London’s most famous landmark, which towers of the city of London, Big Ben is not the clock tower but the largest bell which strikes the hour. Found on Parliament Square, SW1 this is a must see landmark in London, and the accuracy of the clock movement is controlled by the placing of old pennies in the mechanism. Nearest station from Big Ben is Westminster tube station.
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The London Eye is a thrilling experience, it’s ‘the way the world sees London. Awarded for numerous awards this year, the London Eye is the best way to take a picture of London as a whole in one single shot; an experience can never be easily forgotten. London Eye is situated on the South Bank of the River Thames and is a approximately five minutes walking distance from Waterloo tube station.
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Notice the cars are on the wrong side of the road.

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Stamford Hill
From Downtown I took The Underground To Stamford Hill which i stayed for shabbos.
Bais Lubavitch
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Mikvah
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Avremel Raskin
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Just when i thought i would be able to catch up on some sleep Friday Night there was 2 Sholom Zochers, one was at Berel Futerfas's house so i had to go, so there was another late night. Shabbos morning i got up early for Chasidus and then there was a Farby after Musaf for Shabbos Chazak. i lied down for a couple of hours in the afternoon. Motzohai Shabbos didn't arrive till 9:50 till we davened Marriv and Watch the Living Torah and made Havdalah it was 11:15. the time we finished Melava Malkah was after 12, another late night. Sunday. Sunday morning i woke up early for a Sunday that is, i went to Shul Davened with the 1st Minyan. i took the underground back to Hampstead Gardens Suburb.

Sunday
I had the whole day set up with a friend of mine in London but the Rain decided it was his day so it basically knock out our plans and we basically just ended up going to the Tower Of London. we went to the Tower of London and the Tower Bridge, on the way to Central London we stop at the old Sfardi Synagogue. we got back at 6 p.m. and then i went to Cousins house for Supper. after that i went to be Menachem Avel one of the anash who needed a Minyan. we then went to Carmelli Bakery .
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The Bevis Marks Synagogue, or Spanish and Portuguese Synagogue is the oldest Jewish house of worship in London; established by the Sephardic Jews in 1698, when Rabbi David Nieto took spiritual charge of the congregation. At that time the worshipers met in a small synagogue in Creechurch Lane; but the considerable influx of Jews made it necessary to obtain other and commodious quarters. Accordingly a committee was appointed, consisting of Antonio Gomes Serra, Menasseh Mendes, Alfonso Rodrigues, Manuel Nunez Miranda, Andrea Lopez, and Pontaleao Rodriguez. It investigated matters for nearly a year, and on February 12, 1699, signed a contract with Joseph Avis, a Quaker, for the construction of a building to cost £2,750. Avis would later decline to collect his fee. On June 24 of the same year, the committee leased from Lady Ann Pointz (alias Littleton) and Sir Thomas Pointz (alias Littleton) a tract of land at Plough Yard, in Bevis Marks, for sixty-one years, with the option of renewal for another thirty-eight years, at £120 a year.
Avis began building at once, incorporating in the roof a beam from a royal ship presented by Queen Anne herself. The structure was completed and dedicated in 1702, and, with the exception of the roof, which was destroyed by fire in 1738, and repaired in 1749, is today as it was over 300 years ago. In the interior decorations and arrangement the influence of the great Amsterdam synagogue of 1677 is apparent. In 1747 Benjamin Mendes da Costa bought the lease of the ground on which the building stood, and presented it to the congregation, vesting the deeds in the names of a committee consisting of Gabriel Lopez de Britto, David Aboab Ozorio, Moses Gomes Serra, David Franco, Joseph Jessurun Rodriguez, and Moses Mendes da Costa.

The Bevis Marks Synagogue was for more than a century the religious center of the Anglo-Jewish world, and served as a clearing-house for congregational and individual troubles all the world over; e.g., the appeal of the Jamaican Jews for a reduction in taxation (1736); the internecine quarrel among the Barbados Jews (1753); and the aiding of seven-year-old Moses de Paz, who escaped from Gibraltar in 1777 to avoid an enforced conversion.

The synagogue formed the center of the Sephardic community of London till the foundation of the Bryanstone Street Synagogue, in 1866, after which the attendance at the functions declined so much that in 1886 the yeḥidim contemplated selling the ground and the building; but a Bevis Marks Anti-Demolition League was founded, under the auspices of H. Guedalla and A. H. Newman, and the proposed demolition was given up. The synagogue held its tricentenary
Bevis Marks Synagogue the oldest in Great Britain.
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Tower of London: was founded by William the Conqueror in 1066-7 and enlarged and modified by successive sovereigns. Today the Tower of London is one of the world\'s most famous and spectacular fortresses. It symbolizes nearly 1000 years of Britain’s royal history, is a home to the English Crown Jewels and the largest diamond in the world. Yeoman Warders, or Beefeaters, in the Tudor costumes, treat groups of sightseers to their own brand of guided tour, an entertaining mix of history and myth. Discover its 1000-year history as a royal palace and fortress, prison and place of execution, mint, arsenal, menagerie and jewel house.
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Traitors Gate
Traitors Gate was originally known as Water Gate, but was later changed when it was used as the landing for the Crown's enemies. All important prisoners entered the Tower through this gate. According to legend when Princess Elizabeth arrived on Palm Sunday 1554 she refused at first to land at the gate, angrily proclaiming that she was no traitor. A sharp shower of rain however, caused her to change her mind. Later when as Queen she visited the Tower she insisted on passing through Traitors Gate. "What was good enough for Elizabeth the Princess is good enough for Elizabeth the Queen", she is supposed to have told the Constable.
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Model of Tower Of London
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HMS Belfast Battle Cruiser from World War 2

Execution Block and Axe in the White Tower.
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Tower Bridge: is a bascule bridge in London, over the River Thames. It is close to the Tower of London, which gives it its name. It is often accidentally called London Bridge, which is the next bridge upstream. The bridge is owned and maintained by Bridge House Estates, a charitable trust overseen by the Corporation of London.
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Sader Sichos
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Toilets all over London they are for 2 people not one.
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Shluchim Office
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The Yeshivah
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Mikvah
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Dining Room
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Inyuni Geulah Shiur
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CARMELLI
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Monday:
When i thought maybe i could get 1 sunny day out of 5 the rain still hadn't had enough and it took the day for itself as well. I went to Central London to Baker street and caught The Original Tour bus hip on and hop off. i got off at the London Eye. and then went a A Boat Ride on the Thames. after that i walked over to the Millennium Bridge the Foot Bridge. i hoped back on and finished the ride which was another 1 1/2 Hours. i then took the underground to the Hip down "Camden Town" I then return to Easy Finchley to catch the bus to yeshiva but it took a hour to come because of traffic.
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The Original Tour
The Original Tour provides more than just a great way to travel around London. Founded in 1951 at the time of The Festival of Britain and now the largest and most popular sightseeing operator in the world, it has become established as THE essential introduction to London. Our famous Hop-on Hop-off service allows you to board any of our award winning London sightseeing buses along all of our tour routes at over 90 different stops with an entertaining 'live-guided' commentary in English or a wide choice of other languages. Our Kids' Club provides an educational but fun alternative for 5-12 year olds. Our services are frequent and reliable with tours running daily, every 15-20 minutes. We invite you to experience all the magical sights and sounds of London in a comfortable and secure environment.
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London Eye
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Buckingham Palace
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The Parliament-Big Ben
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London View
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The Gherkin
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Artist Dali if you never heard of him dont worry I never heard of him either.
Salvador Felip Jacint Dalí Domènech (Catalan) Salvador Felipe Jacinto Dalí Domènech (Spanish), (May 11, 1904January 23, 1989) was one of the most important painters of the 20th century. He is best known for his surrealist work identified by its striking, bizarre, dreamlike images, combined with his excellent draftsmanship and painterly skills influenced by the Renaissance masters. An artist of great talent and imagination, he had a love of doing unusual things to draw attention to himself. This sometimes irked those who loved his art as much as it annoyed his critics, since his eccentric theatrical manner sometimes overshadowed his artwork in public attention.
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Imax Cinema
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Cleopatra's Needles
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Garbage Dump
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Greater London Authority Mayor's Office
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Millenium Bridge


The London Millennium Footbridge is a pedestrian-only steel suspension bridge crossing the River Thames in London, England, between the existing Southwark Bridge and Blackfriars Bridge, linking Bankside with the City. It was the first new bridge across the Thames in London since Tower Bridge in 1894 and it is owned and maintained by Bridge House Estates, a charitable trust overseen by the Corporation of London.
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The Monument The Monument was erected by Sir Christopher Wren in 1677 to commemorate the Great Fire in London in 1666. The Monument has a height of 66 metres, which is the distance to the house in Pudding Lane where the fire broke out. It is the tallest freestanding stone column in the world. If you climb 311 steps up to the top, you will enjoy a fantastic view over London. Opening Times: From 09:30 to 17:00 Daily Closed 24th & 25th December Admission Fees: £2.50 Adults, £1.00 5-15s, free for under 5’s.
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Trafalgar Square
Trafalgar Square is a square in central London that commemorates the Battle of Trafalgar (1805), a British naval victory of the Napoleonic Wars. The original name was to have been "King William the Fourth's Square", but George Ledwell Taylor suggested the name "Trafalgar Square".
The area had been the site of the King's Mews since the time of Edward I. In the 1820s the Prince Regent engaged the landscape architect John Nash to redevelop the area. Nash cleared the square as part of his Charing Cross Improvement Scheme. The present architecture of the square is due to Sir Charles Barry and was completed in 1845.
The square is a popular site for political demonstrations, is the site of Nelson's Column, and related sculptures of note.
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Oxford Street
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The London Dungeon is a tourist attraction based in Tooley Street, London, near London Bridge rail station. It recreates various gory historical events in a style which attempts to make them appealing to the younger generation. Some of the more than 40 exhibits include 'The Great Fire of London', 'Jack the Ripper', 'Judgement Day', 'The Torture Chamber', 'Henry VIII', 'The Tower of London' and 'The French Revolution'. In 2003 a special exhibition opened on the Great Plague of 1665.
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Front entrance of the London Dungeon.
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Front entrance of the London Dungeon.


CAMDEN TOWN

Camden Town is a place in the London Borough of Camden, England. It is also sometimes simply known as Camden although this should not be confused with the borough. Camden town is an inner-city district located 2.3 miles (3.7 km) north north-west of Charing Cross, famous for its crowded market and as a centre for alternative lifestyles. The area is popular with students, including those from overseas.

Camden Town has a reputation for readily available drugs.

The area around the tube station and the markets is scruffy, though no worse than many other parts of London, with much rubbish on the street, and too much public urination and vomiting. Matters are better further from the station.

Crime And Safety

Crime is relatively high and it is not uncommon to see tourists wandering around the market without realising that their rucksack has been unzipped and emptied.

Camden Town is not a very dangerous place to visit or work in, and in no way a "no-go" area. The crowds of people who visit the markets do not seem to be worried. Most residents have no particular fear of walking in the area, although more warily when it is quiet in the early hours of the morning.

There is no need to be afraid of visiting, though vigilance against theft of unwatched personal belongings is advisable. Don't let people approach very late at night. People involved in drug transactions are more at risk of crime, particularly would-be purchasers who hand over money and are asked to wait a moment by somebody who then disappears while supposedly getting the merchandise.

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The Flat
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We davned Mincah and then i head to Golders Green Green to eat something we ended up just going back to Milk and Honey. i went to the Shul Bais shmuel and bumped into Pinchos Wilhelm. i then return to yeshiva and put my things together for my flight. Tuesday. My flight was at 8:25 AM so i had to take the 6:00 AM EasyBus From Downtown so i took a Taxi to Central London at 5:20 in the morning.
Goodbye Party
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3 Comments:

At 10:31 AM, Anonymous getzy said...

where in the world is carmen sandiago?

 
At 7:32 AM, Blogger Pesach said...

Impressive photographs, I live here and it doesn't look nearly as good.

 
At 12:28 AM, Anonymous California said...

Mazel Tov!
Happy Birthday!!!

 

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